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  • UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE

    INTRODUCTION

    At UC Davis, the Psychology program has several objectives:

    • it presents an introduction to the study of individual and group behavior;
    • it provides a liberal arts curriculum for students looking for employment in business, government, personnel work, and other fields directly after obtaining their bachelor’s degree;
      and
    • it prepares students for graduate study in various areas of psychology, leading to teaching, research and applied work.

    Students who have majored in psychology at UCD have selected many different careers after graduation. Psychology majors have gone into industry, teaching, sales, social work, counseling, medicine, the ministry, and nursing, to name a few.


    THE MAJOR

    The psychology program at UCD is broad and includes students and faculty with a variety of interests. The department has developed five major areas of emphasis:

    Perception Cognitive Neuroscience Psychology, which involves the study of awareness and thought, and includes such topics as perception, learning, memory, and consciousness; Psychobiology, which involves the study of the biological correlates of behavior and includes such topics as physiological psychology, sensory processes, health psychology, and animal behavior; Social-Personality Psychology, which involves the study of the individual in his or her social environment and includes such topics as personality theory, abnormal psychology, individual differences, developmental psychology, and social psychology; Developmental, which includes imaging the developing brain, children's psychological understanding or theory of mind (e.g., knowledge about people's thoughts, beliefs, desires, and emotions), children’s language development, children's social development; and Quantitative, which includes experimental design and the analysis of variance, regression analysis, and multivariate analysis.

    The department offers the Bachelor of Arts program for students interested in the liberal arts and the Bachelor of Science program geared for students with an interest in either biology or mathematics. The main objective of both programs is a broad introduction to the scope of contemporary psychology. In addition to completing a number of common core courses for their degree, students may take specialty courses on such far ranging topics as sex differences, genius and creativity, and environmental awareness.

    The department strongly encourages students to become involved in individual research projects under the direction of faculty members and to participate in our internship program to broaden your experiences and understanding of the field of psychology.

     

    CHOOSING AN AREA OF INTEREST

    1. To obtain career information, a first step is to attend one or more workshops which are offered by the Internships and Career Center, South Hall. They will help you become aware of resources (such as the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory) which can help you choose a career compatible with your interests and skills.
    2. If you already know your interests and want to develop them further you can: (a) look at the posted faculty research interest information on our website or stop in to see faculty during their office hours or (b) try different psychology courses that are interesting to you.
    3. A further step toward preparing for a career is to enroll in Internship and Career workshops offered each quarter. Sessions include: a) Internship Information Workshops, b) Careers, c) Company Information Meetings, d) Basic Steps to Finding a Job, e) Resume Writing, f) Interviewing Techniques, g) Corporate Culture, h) Writing a Curriculum Vitae, i) Interviewing for Faculty Positions, j) Using Aggie Job Link for your job search, k) Go to a career fair, introduce yourself and hand-out resumes to companies.
     

    GETTING TO KNOW YOUR PROFESSORS AND FELLOW STUDENTS

    Whether you decide to gain research experience, apply to graduate school, enroll in a graduate seminar, or apply for a psychology-related job, you will be asked to provide the names of faculty members who can evaluate your abilities and performance.

    FIND A SPONSOR. It is very important to become acquainted with a professor who can support you in your endeavors. The following steps will not only help you to become better acquainted with the faculty but will better acquaint you with the Psychology Department as a whole and perhaps help you to clarify your own interests in the field:

    1. Talk with a staff advisor in 141 Young about areas of interests of the faculty or about the psychology major in general.
    2. Take advantage of professors’ office hours. If you can’t think of anything about yourself or the class to discuss, ask about the professor’s research.
    3. Ask a professor to sponsor your individual study project. If you choose to study an area of psychology through practical experience you can receive Psychology 99 or 199 credit of up to 5 units per quarter (each unit is considered to be the equivalent of three hours of work per week). This experience may be obtained by either working on the professor’s research project or by conducting your own project.
    4. Take a professor out to lunch or dinner. Use the Dean Witter Fund to become better acquainted with your professor. If you feel uncomfortable about approaching a professor with an invitation, bring along a friend. For more information about obtaining money for this purpose call the Student Affairs, (530) 752-2416.
    5. Become an active member of the Undergraduate Psychology Club. The Undergraduate Psychology Club is a student organization whose goals include facilitating student-student and student-faculty interaction, providing a forum for student ideas, and promoting intellectual development. The club is open to all psychology majors and minors. Members are responsible for organizing informal pot-lucks and informational colloquia.
    6. Consider applying for Psi Chi membership. Our Psi Chi chapter of the national Psychology honor society holds membership drives in fall and spring quarters. A 3.20 upper division major GPA (minimum of 16 units) and a 3.20 overall college (UC) GPA is required. Declared majors and minors may apply. Psi Chi sponsors speaker programs which offer students the opportunity to discuss areas of research interest with faculty.
    7. Participate in the annual Psychology Department Research Conference at the end of spring quarter. With faculty sponsorship you are invited to present your work in a talk or poster. See the peer advisor for more information.
     

    DID YOU KNOW THAT....?

    • you can obtain Transcript Notation indicating the location of your internship. Refer to Interships and Career Center to help you apply for TN through Aggie Job Link.
    • The Psychology Department frequently offers colloquia which provide the opportunity to hear graduate students, faculty, and visiting faculty speak on a variety of topics. Check our website at psychology.ucdavis.edu.
    • To file to graduate:http://registrar3.ucdavis.edu/graduation/. To file for commencement: http://commencement.ucdavis.edu/. The dates for filing are published in the General Catalog and on the registrar.ucdavis.edu. 
    • Courses in which a D+ or lower (including N/P) is received, can be repeated. The original grade remains on the transcript, but only the new grade will be included in your GPA for ONLY the first 16 units you repeat.

    And lastly — remember, though university staff are here to assist you, YOU ARE PERSONALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR FULFILLING ALL MAJOR AND COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS.

    Make it a point to acquaint yourself with the regulations set out in the General Catalog. Stop by 141 Young Hall, the Psychology advising office, anytime you have a question or want a degree check.


    EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE

    If you are interested in employment related to psychology, but do not intend to pursue a graduate degree, you may want to consider the following:

    Community Relations Officer: works either for business or government in promoting good relations with the local community.

    Counselor: there are a few entry-level “counselor” positions available in social work; social service and mental health agencies for students with a bachelor’s degree. Most such positions, however, require graduate training.

    Human Resources: work with recruitment and equal opportunities for women and minorities; employed by business, industries, schools, and government.

    Recreation Worker: plans and supervises community recreation facilities.

    Advertising Copywriter: researches audience and media, writes text for advertisements.

    Health Educator: gives public information about health and disease.

    Psychiatric Assistant: administers routine tests, helps with patients under supervision of psychiatrist.

    Director of Volunteer Service: responsible for volunteers—recruits, supervises, trains, and evaluates volunteers.

    Customs Inspector: serves at international borders and airports in investigations and inquiries.

    Probation and Parole Officer: psychology background often preferred for such positions, especially with adolescent parolees.

    Technical Writer: researches and writes material dealing with social science issues for magazines, newspapers and journals.

    Sales Representative: major publishers of psychology books and manufacturers of psychological equipment often seek psychology majors for sales representatives.

    Opinion Survey Researchers: helps conduct opinion polls.

    Laboratory Assistant: helps conduct behavioral research in university or industrial settings. 

    State Government: http://www.ca.gov/state/portal/myca_homepage.jsp

    Employment opportunities for psychology graduates will vary from state to state. Education, experience, and examination performance will determine merit ratings for state jobs. For information concerning opportunities in California contact:

    State Personnel Office
    Recruitment Supervisor
    State Personnel Board
    801 Capitol Mall
    Sacramento
    , CA 95814

    Federal Government: http://www.fedworld.gov/

    There are extensive opportunities at the federal government level as well. For information

    contact:

    Federal Job Information Center
    Federal Building
    650 Capitol Mall
    Sacramento
    , CA 95814

    Remember, no matter what your major, you will be graduating with a degree from UC Davis. That, within itself is a great accomplishment and psychology or not, you can take your degree in any direction you want. Be open to career paths that you may have not considered before.

     

    SPECIALIZATION REQUIRING GRADUATE TRAINING*

     

    These areas overlap with one another to varying degrees, and within these broad categories are subcategories of specialization. Your possession of an A.B. or B.S. is not sufficient to enter any of these occupations. You must first obtain specialized professional training in a graduate program.

     

    Clinical Psychologist: specialize in the assessment and treatment of persons suffering from emotional or adjustment problems; knowledgeable about the psychology of personality, psychopathology, and psychometrics.

    Comparative Psychologist: primarily concerned with the comparison of the behavior of different species; knowledgeable about evolutionary and genetic determinants of behavior.

    Developmental Psychologist: describe and explain the systematic changes in an individual’s behavior that occur throughout life.

    Educational Psychologist: concerned with individual differences, learning, motivation, personality, group behavior, and other factors which affect childrens’ interactions with their educational environments.

    Engineering (human factors) Psychologist: designs and improves the procedures, equipment, and settings involved in work.

    Environmental Psychologist: studies the interaction between people and manmade environments.

    Experimental Psychologist: any psychologist who uses experimental techniques; that is, research procedures involving manipulation and control. Generally referred to by specific area of interest such as learning psychologist, perception psychologist, psycholinguist, social psychologist, etc.

    Forensic Psychologist: applies psychological principles to legal issues. Their expertise is often essential in court.

    Health Psychologist: interested in how biological, psychological, and social factors affect health and illness. They identify the kinds of medical treatment people seek and get; how patients handle illness; why some people don’t follow medical advice; and the most effective ways to control pain or to change poor health habits.

    Industrial/Organizational Psychologist: applies psychological principles and research methods to the work place in the interest of improving productivity and quality of work life. Many serve as human resources specialists, helping organizations with staffing, training, and employee development and management in such areas as strategic planning, quality management, and coping with organizational change.

    Mathematical psychology: involves the development of mathematical models and explanations of psychological processes.

    Neuropsychologist: explores the relationships between brain systems and behavior.

    Personality Psychologist: involves research and theory which accounts for the individual’s wholeness, consistency, and uniqueness. Psychopathology or Abnormal Psychology are closely related fields which are concerned with personal and social adjustment and the conditions that promote effective personalities.

    Physiological Psychologist: studies the biological and physiological processes that underlie behavior and experience. Areas of concern include the neural mechanisms of learning and memory, sleep, and emotional behavior.

    Psychiatrist: a physician (MD) who has undergone a three to five year residency which involves specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of emotional and behavioral disorders.

    Psychoanalyst: a psychiatrist with additional training in the theory and personality and method of treatment originated by Sigmund Freud.

    Psychometric (Quantitative) Psychologist: typically well trained in mathematics, statistics, and the use of computers. The psychometrist is interested in the quantitative measurement of human abilities, interests, and personality.

    Rehabilitation Psychologist: works with stroke and accident victims, people with mental retardation, and those with developmental disabilities caused by such conditions as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and autism.

    School Psychologist: works closely with educational institutions to develop special educational programs, improve teaching effectiveness and in general facilitate the intellectual, social, and emotional development of children.

    Social Psychologist: typically studies areas which integrate the psychologist’s traditional emphasis on the individual with the sociologist’s traditional emphasis on the group. Generally ask questions about the individual, groups, and the interrelationships among individuals and groups.

    Sports Psychologist: helps athletes refine their focus on competition goals, become more motivated, and learn to deal with the anxiety and fear of failure that often accompany competition. The field is growing as sports of all kinds become more and more competitive and attract younger children than ever.

    *Information taken from APA publication: Careers for the Twenty-First Century, 1996.

     

    PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT

    UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY ADVISORS

    Karen Bales, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2000
    Comparative neurobiology of monogamy

    Shelley Blozis, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 1998
    Mixed-effects models, structured latent curve models, factor analysis, and analysis of longitudinal data.

    Arne Ekstrom, Ph.D., Brandeis University, 2004
    Cognitive processes and underlying spatial memo

    Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1986
    Personality and religion, goals and motivation, gratitude and well-being

    Emilio Ferrer-Caja, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2002
    Longitudinal data analysis techniques, conceptualizing developmental processes, motivational development

    Joy Geng, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon Univeristy, 2003
    fMRi, eye tracking

    Simona Ghetti, Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 2002
    Memory development

    Gail S. Goodman, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1977
    Memory development, children’s testimony and child abuse

    Katherine Graf Estes Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison 2007
    Investigation of how infants learn from statistical regularities in the language they hear and the nature of what they learn

     

    Paul Hastings, Ph.D., Toronto, 1995
    Socialization, emotion regulation, prosocial development, psychopathology

    Gregory Herek, Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1983
    Stigma and prejudice; lesbian/gay and sexual minority issues; AIDS stigma; antigay violence

    Petr Janata, Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1996
    Perception, attention, memory, action and emotion interact in the context of natural behaviors, with an emphasis on music

    Leah A. Krubitzer, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1989
    Evolutionary neurobiology

    Kristin Lagattuta Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1999
    Children’s knowledge about thinking and emotion, early psychological understanding

    Alison Ledgerwood, Ph.D., New York University, 2008
    Attitudes, social influence, social cognition, intergroup conflict

    Debra A. Long, Ph.D., Memphis State University, 1989
    Language processing and reading ability

    Steven Luck, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, 1993
    visual working memory, dysfunctions of attention, neurological disorders

    Ron Mangun, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 1987
    Cognitive neuroscience of attention and awareness

    Lisa Oakes, Ph.D. University of Texas, Austin, 1991
    Child development, infant cognition

    Cynthia Pickett, Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1999
    Self and social identity, social cognition social exclusion

    Charan Ranganath, Ph.D., Northwestern University, Evanston, 1999
    Neurocognitive structure of human memory

    Susan Rivera, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1998
    Development of symbolic representation; developmental neuroscience; neurodevelopmental disorders

    Richard W. Robins, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1995
    Personality and self esteem development, self and emotion, interpersonal perception

    Jeffrey C. Schank, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1991
    Mathematical modeling of social and physiological processes

    Joanna Scheib, Ph.D., McMaster University, 1996
    Mate choice and reproductive relationships, evolutionary psychology

    Phillip R. Shaver, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1970
    Close relationships, attachment theory and emotion

    Jeffrey Sherman, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1994
    Social cognition, sterotyping and prejudice, impression formation, self-perception

    Dean Keith Simonton, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1975
    Genius, creativity, leadership, talent, esthetics, historiometrics

    Tamara Swaab, Ph.D., University of Nijmegen and Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands, 1994
    Cognitive and neura

     

    PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR - UC DAVIS
    BACHELOR OF ARTS
    updated 9/2014

    REQUIREMENTS FOR DECLARING MAJOR: Completion of lower division courses with a combined GPA of 2.50 (all courses must be taken for a letter grade). A 2.00 GPA is required in upper division Psychology and overall UCD course work. 

    LOWER DIVISION

    Psychology 1

    Biological Sciences 2A(5)

    Statistics 13 or 100

                   or

    Psychology 41

    Biological Sciences 10 and one of the following: ANT 1, MCB 10, NPB 10(3)

    +Students who entered college prior to fall 2012 have an additional preparatory course included in requirements for declaring the major:  Sociology/Cultural ANT (4). 


    UPPER DIVISION (10-11 classes)

    Forty (40) upper division units including 6 core group courses: 2 from two of the four Core Groups and 1 from each of the remaining two Core Groups. The remainder of the 40 required units can be taken from other Core Group courses or Psychology courses that are not in the Core Groups.  Non-Core Group courses are called "Psychology Electives". 

    Core Group A
    Perception/Cognition & Cognitive Neuroscience

    Core Group B
    Psychobiology

    Core Group C
    Social/Personality

     
    Core Group D
    Developmental


    100 


    101


    151

    140** or HDE 100A or HDE 100B

    130

    113

    152

    141 /HDE 101

    131

    121

    154

    142 /HDE 102

    132

    123 (3)

    158

    143

    135

    125 (3)

    161

    146
    136

    126

    162

    148
     

    137

    168
     
     

    159

     
     
           

     
    Elective Courses (16-18 Units)
    -Any of the PSC courses below, or additional PSC courses from the Core groups above.
                                                                      

    103A (5)
     
    180ABC (4)
    103B (5)
    153 (4)
    185 (4)
    104 (4) rarely offered
    155 (4)
    190 (4)
    107(4) rarely offered
    157 (4)
    192 (4 units max toward major)**
    120 (4)
    165 (4)
    194HA/HB (3/3)
    124 (4)

    199 (No max for major)
     
     
    198 (No max for major)
    AND


    NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES APPROVED FOR UPPER-DIVISION

    PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR, UC DAVIS
    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE - BIOLOGY Emphasis
    updated 9/2014


     REQUIREMENTS FOR DECLARING MAJOR as of Fall 2013:  (Sociology/Cultural ANT course is also required for declaring major for all students entering college prior to fall 2013.)

    Completion of the following 4 courses with a combined GPA of 2.50.  All courses must be taken for a letter grade:

    Psychology 1
    Psychology 41
    Statistics 13 or 100 (or 102)
    Biological Sciences 2A.

    A 2.00 GPA is required in upper division Psychology and overall UCD course work.

    Preparatory Subject Matter

    Psychology 1

    Chemistry 2A(5) & 2B(5)

    Statistics 13 or 100 (or 102)

    Chemistry 8A(2) & 8B(4), or Chemistry118A & 118B, or Chemistry 128A & B(3-3)

    Psychology 41

    Biology 2A(5) & 2B(5) & 2C(5)

    Math 16A(3) or 17A or 21A

    Math 16B(3) or 17B or 21B

    Physics 7A &7B or 10

     

    UPPER DIVISION PSYCHOLOGY COURSES

    Forty (40) upper division Psychology units, including 7 core group courses from the following: 2 from Group A, 3 from Group B, 1 from Group C, and 1 from Group D. Balance of 40 units can be taken from other core or non-core (aka PSC electives) upper-division Psychology courses.

     

    Core Group A (2)
    Perception/Cognition & Cognitive Neuroscience

    Core Group B (3)
    Psychobiology

    Core Group C (1)
    Social/Personality

     
    Core Group D (1)
    Developmental


    100 


    101


    151

    140** or HDE 100A or HDE 100B

    130

    113

    152

    141 /HDE 101

    131

    121

    154

    142 /HDE 102

    132

    123 (3)

    158

    143

    135

    125 (3)

    161

    146
    136

    126

    162

    148
     

    137

    168
     
     

    159

     
     
    ** 2 units credit for Psc 140 (112) if HDE 100A or 100B previously completed.


     UPPER DIVISION EMPHASIS

    Biological Sciences 101 (4)

    Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior 101 (5)

     
    103A (5)
     
    180ABC (4)
    103B (5)
    153 (4)
    185 (4)
    104 (4) rarely offered
    155 (4)
    190 (4)
    107 (4) rarely offered
    157 (4)
    192 (4 units MAX)**
    120 (4)
    165 (4)
    194HA/HB (3/3)
    124 (4)
    170 (4)
    198 (1-6)
     
    175 (4)
    199 (1-6)

    NOTE: Psychology 41 is a prerequisite for most upper division courses. Psychology 41 or Statistics 13 or 100 should be completed in the first year. Students who plan to do graduate work in any area of psychology are strongly encouraged to complete Psychology 103A & 103B. Refer to the General Catalog for more information on major requirements and a description of our High/Highest Honors program.



    GRADUATION ESSENTIALS
    COLLEGE OF LETTERS & SCIENCE - UC DAVIS
    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

    UNIT REQUIREMENTS

    Minimum 180
    Maximum (limit 225)
    UPPER DIVISION (courses 100-199) 64

    GENERAL EDUCATION (use current catalog to select curses)

    Refer to the General Catalog for specific requirements
    Fulfilled by IGETC

    AREA REQUIREMENTS (use current catalog to select courses)

    Satisfaction of General Education requirements
    Natural Science/Mathematics 90 units
    (Fulfilled by IGETC)

    PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR - UC DAVIS

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, MATH Emphasis
    updated 9/2014

    REQUIREMENTS FOR DECLARING MAJOR: Completion of lower division courses with a combined GPA of 2.50 (all courses must be taken for a letter grade). A 2.00 GPA is required in upper division Psychology and overall UCD course work.

    Psychology 1
    Psychology 41
    Statistics 13 or 100 or 102
    Biological Sciences 2A
       or Biological Sciences 10 and one of the following: ANT 1(Y), MCB 10, or NPB 10

    *A Sociology/Cultural ANT course is required for all students entering college prior to fall 2012. 


    LOWER DIVISION

    Psychology 1

    Math 21A , & Math 21B, & Math 21C

    Statistics 13 or  100

    Chemistry 10 or Chemistry2A(5) & 2B(5) or Chemistry2AH(5) & 2BH(5)

    Psychology 41

    Physics 7A &7B, or 10 (4)

    Biological Sciences 2A(5) or Biological Sciences 10 & one of the following: ANT 1(Y), MCB 10, or NPB 10(3)

     
    ECS 10 or ECS 30

     

    UPPER DIVISION PSYCHOLOGY COURSES

    Forty (40) upper division Psychology units, including 5 core group courses from the following: 2 from Group A, 2 from Group B, 1 from either Group C or Group D and completion of Psychology 103A, and 103B. Balance of 40 units can be taken from ANY other core or elective upper division Psychology courses.
    Must also complete 8 units of statistics emphasis courses in addition to the 40 units of Psychology.

    Required Upper Division Courses
     

    PSC 103A (5)

    PSC 103B (5)

     

    Core Group A (2)
    Perception/Cognition & Cognitive Neuroscience

    Core Group B (2)
    Psychobiology

    Core Group C
    Social/Personality

     
    Core Group D
    Developmental


    100 


    101


    151

    140** or HDE 100A or HDE 100B

    130

    113

    152

    141 /HDE 101

    131

    121

    154

    142 /HDE 102

    132

    123 (3)

    158

    143

    135

    125 (3)

    161

    146
    136

    126

    162

    148
     

    137

    168
     
     

    159

     
     

     ** 2 units credit for Psc 140 (112) if HDE 100A or 100B previously completed.

    Upper Division Statistics Emphasis
    (must complete ONE of the three pairs listed - 2 courses total).

    STA 106 & 108 
    STA 130A & 130B    
    STA 131A & 131B


    Elective Courses (12-15 units)

    103A (5)
     
    180ABC (4)
    103B (5)
    153 (4)
    185 (4)
    104 (4) rarely offered
    155 (4)
    190 (4)
    107 (4) rarely offered
    157 (4)
    192 (4 units MAX)**
    120 (4)

    SHOULD I CHOOSE THE A.B. OR B.S. PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY?

     

    The Psychology Department offers both A. B. (Bachelor of Arts) and B.S. (Bachelor of Science) degrees.

    The differences between the A.B. and B.S. degrees are:

    1. The B.S. degree requires a total of 90 units in natural science/mathematics in order to fulfill the L&S Area Breadth requirement; in contrast students choosing the A.B. degree fulfill the L&S Area Breadth requirement through either a double major, minor, "mini minor" or 3 upper and/or lower division courses in Art, Music, Art History and/or Drama (see Area (Breadth) Requirement List under “College of Letters and Science” in the General Catalog).
    2. The A.B. degree requires one years fluency (or 15 units) of a single foreign language; the B.S. has no foreign language requirement.


    Graduate and professional schools in general are not concerned with the kind of degree you possess but rather with the courses you have taken. Generally speaking, graduate programs check your GPA, statement of purpose, letters of recommendation and GRE test scores. If you are genuinely interested in math or the natural sciences, you may prefer to go the B.S. route. The A.B. degree may be attractive to students interested in earning a minor or perhaps pursuing a double major, and for students who desire more freedom when choosing their elective psychology courses.


    The B.S. and A.B. degrees are equally acceptable for students interested in Psychology graduate school and pre-professional schools (check with the pre-health, pre-law, or pre-graduate advisers in Advising Services, South Hall, for details). There is a good deal of overlap between the B.S. degree and many health program requirements, so those students interested in the health field generally choose the B.S. degree. The important point is to determine what courses would best prepare you for the programs to which you may be applying. For guidance, see a faculty member in your area of interest and check course requirements in individual graduate programs. Applying to Graduate School Guide, available on the website, is an excellent resource for information on psychology graduate school course requirements: http://www.gradschools.com.

     

    PSYCHOLOGY MINOR

    For a student to elect a Psychology minor and have it certified on his/her final transcript, the minor should be declared when the final minor course is scheduled on the student's record.  Usually this is the quarter before graduation.  This way the minor adviser can determine that the correct minor courses have been or will be completed.  The actual deadline to turn in the minor petition is the 10th day of instruction of the quarter of graduation. Students may obtain the form for declaring a minor at their respective college Dean’s office.


    MINOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

    Psychology 1 and completion of 20 upper division Psychology units, including at least one course from each of the Core Groups A through D, plus enough PSC elective units to total 20 upper division units. 199 units may be included as part of the 20-unit requirement. You must have a combined grade point average of 2.0 in all courses required for the minor.


     

    Core Group A
    Perception/Cognition & Cognitive Neuroscience

    Core Group B
    Psychobiology

    Core Group C
    Social/Personality

     
    Core Group D
    Developmental


    100 


    101


    151

    140** or HDE 100A or HDE 100B

    130

    113

    152

    141 /HDE 101

    131

    121

    154

    142 /HDE 102

    132

    123 (3)

    158

    143

    135

    125 (3)

    161

    146
    136

    126

    162

    148
     

    127

    168
     
     

    137

     
     
      159    
     
     

    Elective Courses include any and all Core Group courses as well as those not in the Core Groups:

    103A (5)
     
    180ABC (4)
    103B (5)
    153 (4)
    185 (4)
    104 (4) rarely offered
    155 (4)
    190 (4)
    107 (4) rarely offered
    157 (4)
    192 (4 units MAX)**
    120 (4)
    165 (4)
    194HA/HB (3/3)
    124 (4)
    170 (4)
    198 (1-6)
     
     
    175 (4)
    199 (1-6)
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    *2 units credit for Psc 140 (formerly PSC 112) if HDE 100A or HDE 100B have been previously completed.

    ** Maximum of 4 192 units can be used toward upper division major requirement (192 has a 12-unit
     college maximum).

    PSC 197T does not count toward upper division major units.


    http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/department/manuals/Undergraduate/GradGuide_NEW_2012.pdf