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Lab members

The people that make it happen....

Alyssa Borders

  Alyssa Borders

Graduate Student
B.S. in Neuroscience from University of Michigan 2009
Email:

I am interested in two lines of research about processes supported by the hippocampus. Specifically I am investigating how the hippocampus supports memory of high-resolution information as well as when it is necessary to bind items, features, and context together. Occasionally these two lines overlap and make for some very intriguing questions about what my hippocampus is really doing in there. My current projects involve a combination of behavioral experiments, patient studies, and fMRI methods.

 

Robin Goodrich

  Robin Goodrich

Graduate Student
B.A. in Psychology from San Francisco State University, 2011
Email:

Robin is interested in the social cognitive neuroscience of human memory and studies these processes using neuroimaging (fMRI) and electrophysiological (EEG) techniques. Her previous work has focused on how essentialist beliefs and categorization of social groups influence perception of and memory for faces using ERPs in order to link observed cognitive phenomena with biological explanations. Moving forward, Robin seeks to elucidate how personal beliefs about social groups can help or hinder perception and memory within the dual process theory of recognition memory, as well as to examine the neural mechanisms underlying these processes. She also has a particular fondness for owls and the color green, and a deeply rooted fear of heights and leprechauns.

 

Iain Harlow

  Iain Harlow

Post-Doctoral Researcher
Ph.D. from University of Edinburgh, 2011
Email:

I study the processes that underlie human memory: what they are, how they should be described and how they interact to support memory for different tasks. Currently I am using high resolution fMRI to understand how the hippocampus supports the storage and recollection of precise episodic details. I am also interested in how recollection and familiarity should be modelled behaviourally, which is important for several reasons. Firstly, estimates of their contribution to a given task are required for the interpretation of neural and imaging data. Secondly, assessing promising computational models of memory circuits, as well as linking these to broader cognitive models and behaviour, requires detailed, quantitative measures of recollection. Finally, such detailed measures also provide us with a richer understanding of exactly how memory is impacted by factors in the laboratory, or in real life (such as the effects of aging).

 

Andrew McCullough

  Andrew McCullough

Graduate Student
B.A. Psychology from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 2005. M.A. Psychology from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 2010
Email:

Andrew's primary research interests lie in elucidating the cognitive processes and neuroanatomical substrates that underlie various aspects of episodic memory encoding and retrieval. As a biologist-in-training, his interest in episodic memory developed as a by-product of his many wonderful personal experiences that later began to blend together in his memory. Thus, he changed disciplines and began researching episodic memory. His Masters thesis explored conditions that increase the probability of false memories, as well as the use of metacognitive strategies to reduce memory intrusions. He is currently working on research projects exploring the effects of attention, emotional arousal, and stress on human memory using behavioral and functional neuroimaging methods. His future research will explore a wide range of memory-related phenomena that pique his interest. When hes not in the lab, you'll find Andrew outside - relaxing in a hammock, boating on Lake Berryessa, playing at the coast, or hiking a mountain - and occasionally pretending to be a rock star.

 

Michael Petzold

  Michael Petzold

Junior Specialist, Lab Manager
B.S. in Psychology from UC Davis
Email:
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/mtpetzold/home
Curriculum Vitæ...

Michael is interested in the dual process theory of recognition memory, as well as the role of sleep in memory consolidation. He began working for the Human Memory Lab in fall of 2011, where he worked under Andrew McCullough in his investigation of post-encoding stress on memory. Outside of the lab, he can be found painting, restoring old furniture, or backpacking in the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

 

Maureen Ritchey

  Maureen Ritchey

Post-Doctoral Researcher
Ph.D. from Duke University, 2011
Email:
Website: http://dml.ucdavis.edu/mritchey
Curriculum Vitæ...

She uses fMRI methods to link memory representations to patterns of neural activity and to evaluate functional networks spanning the medial temporal lobes and beyond.

 

  Matt Sazma

Graduate Student
BA in Psychology from University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 2010;
Email: