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  • PSYCHOLOGY 290    Section: 7

    SEMINAR

    Spring Quarter 2005

    Units: 4
    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. See instructor for CRN.

    COURSE: PSC 290

    1.      Course title:         Current Research and Theory in Affective Science

    2.      Additional prerequisite(s): Participation in NIH Affective Science training program or consent of instructor

    3.      Brief course description:  This course will provide an overview of the study of emotion, a field now referred to as "Affective Science."  The content of the course will span all levels of analysis, including neurobiological, cognitive, behavioral, and cultural approaches.  Specific topics will include: evolutionary perspectives; animal models; the role of neurotransmitters; psychophysiology; nonverbal displays and emotion recognition; emotion regulation and the consequences of suppressing emotion; theory of mind and emotion; neural correlates of emotional reactions; emotion development; and cross-cultural lexical studies of emotion.     

    4.      Course format (lecture, discussion, etc.): A variety of guest lectures will be given by training faculty from the Affective Science training program. Each class will include a combination of lecture and discussion.  Students will read several articles each week and then write 2 or 3 broad questions, which will be used to structure the class discussion.  

    5.  Grading criteria: Students will be graded based on (a) class attendance, (b) participation in class discussions, and (c) the quality of questions provided each week. 

    6.  Textbook(s) or list of sample readings:  Each week, students will read two or three recent journal articles and chapters related to Affective Science.

     

    Text(s):

    Textbook Information not Available Yet
    Classroom Class Schedule Course Website
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    Instructor Instructor Email Office Office Hours
    Richard Robins , Ph.D. 268H Young Hall